Tag Archives: cemetery

#FABTrip15: Pte. John Harold Fenton of Cavendish, Lest We Forget

 

John Harold Fenton reported for duty on June 10, 1918. A farmer’s son from the windswept plain at Cavendish, Alberta, young Fenton was just 17 when he journeyed west to Calgary to enlist in the Alberta Regiment of the Canadian Expeditionary Force.  Possibly driven by patriotism, a desire for adventure, or the need to escape the dusty desolation of the drybelt, Private Fenton signed up just as the Great War was drawing to a close. While Germany’s forces on the Western Front were nearing defeat by October 1918, another deadly foe was emerging from the east, this time closer to home. Read more at www.forgottenalberta.com #LestWeForget #Alberta #Canada #RemembranceDay #WW1 #abandoned #forgotten #pioneer #cemetery #history #mybadlands #FABTrip15 @gregfarries

A photo posted by Jonathan Koch (@forgotten_alberta) on

John Harold Fenton reported for duty on June 10, 1918. A farmer’s son from the windswept plain at Cavendish, Alberta, young Fenton was just 17 when he journeyed west to Calgary to enlist in the Alberta Regiment of the Canadian Expeditionary Force.  Possibly driven by patriotism, a desire for adventure, or the need to escape the dusty desolation of the drybelt, Private Fenton signed up just as the Great War was drawing to a close. While Germany’s forces on the Western Front were nearing defeat by October 1918, another deadly foe  was emerging from the east, this one closer to home.

Continue reading #FABTrip15: Pte. John Harold Fenton of Cavendish, Lest We Forget

#FABTrip15: Milo to Ouelletteville

After leaving Milo, Greg and I ventured north towards Queenstown, a former shipping point along the C.P.R.’s abandoned Lomond Subdivision. Already two hours behind schedule, we made a bee-line for the Drumheller valley, pausing at a small community graveyard along the way.

Continue reading #FABTrip15: Milo to Ouelletteville

Alderson Cemetery

At Alderson Cemetery, the dead of a halcyon era keep silent vigil over a community that, like themselves, passed from existence long ago.

Volunteers from the Redcliff Lions Club maintain the cemetery here, ensuring that a century after its founding, the spirit of this bygone community lives on.

A few notes on the video: The gas plant down the road was the source of (most of) the incessant ambient humming in the video. Fortunately, the drone was punctuated by occasional contributions from the local meadowlark and other feathered friends.

Most importantly, many thanks to my better half, Amanda, for tackling the voiceover; and also for selecting the poem, “But not forgotten”, by American poet, Dorothy Parker.