Tag Archives: Amethyst

Kinnondale the epicentre of “massive meteor strike”?

Welcome to Kinnondale. (Not actually Kinnondale)
Welcome to Kinnondale. (Not actually Kinnondale)

Kinnondale isn’t the end of the world, but you can see what it might look like from there.

A media release from the University of Alberta has reported the discovery of “an ancient ring-like structure in southern Alberta”.

Situated “near the southern Alberta hamlet of Bow City“, it is speculated the impact site was struck by a meteorite large enough to leave an eight-kilometre-wide crater.

The impact site was discovered by a geologist with the Alberta Geological Survey, Paul Glombick, and studied by a U of A team led by Doug Schmitt, Canada Research Chair in Rock Physics.

According to researchers from the Alberta Geological Survey and University of Alberta, the impact would have produced an explosion strong enough to destroy present-day Calgary:

“An impact of this magnitude would kill everything for quite a distance,” [said Doug Schmitt]. “If it happened today, Calgary (200 km to the northwest) would be completely fried and in Edmonton (500 km northwest), every window would have been blown out. Something of that size, throwing that much debris in the air, potentially would have global consequences; there could have been ramifications for decades.”

Having picked up various tidbits of info on what has been referred to as the “Bow City structure” over the years, I believe the impact site is more accurately situated in the Kinnondale district, located west of the present-day hamlet of Bow City.

In the days to come I am going to do my level best to seek out the epicentre of the Bow City meteor strike, which may or may not be within sight of Kinnondale, Alberta.

Stay tuned…

Related:

Top Instagram shots from 2013 – #7

7. Scenes from Kinnondale, Alberta


Six on the list features two older photos taken in the former Kinnondale district of northeast Vulcan County. The first is entitled “Along the road to Amethyst (2010)”  a reference to a former school district and post office once located north of Hwy. 539. The photo below, “The Lunt Place (2007)”, is the former homestead of Joseph and Annie Lunt, who helped found and sustain the Kinnondale community during three decades of drought and hardship. The Lunts left Kinnondale in 1953.

Related: 

 

Taylor Cemetery: “Consecrated, set apart, and dedicated forever.”

On October 1, 2013, I was honoured to be part of a dedication ceremony at Taylor Cemetery, located about five miles west of Bow City (which I have written about here and here). A ceremony was performed by Rev. Gordon Cranch of Vulcan; alongside a plinth and bronze plaque that had been installed previously by Vulcan County to commemorate this nearly forgotten pioneer graveyard.

Continue reading Taylor Cemetery: “Consecrated, set apart, and dedicated forever.”

Who are the forgotten dead of Vulcan County?

Whose remains are buried here?

During the decade after 1916, settlers fled the drought-ridden plains of southeastern Alberta en masse. As David C. Jones outlines in his book, We’ll all be buried down here- The Prairie Drybelt Disaster of 1917-1926, homesteaders often alighted with few possessions, many carrying only “the shirts on their backs”.

In some instances settlers were forced to part with something more dear, the remains of loved ones who had passed on, left behind in lonely, sometimes forgotten, prairie graveyards.

“We’ll all be buried down here in this dry belt, if we wait for the government to get us out,” Jones quotes one settler, who expressed his desire to “Quit the Dry Belt” in no uncertain terms:. “And parts of it are desperately desolate places to be buried in.

One such desperately desolate place was Taylor Cemetery, located in Vulcan County:

Along an unremarkable stretch of road, about seventeen miles northeast of the village of Lomond, lie the forgotten dead of Vulcan County.

On a wind-whipped knoll, just to the north of Secondary Highway 539, a lonely pioneer graveyard endures, as it has for almost a century. Within rest the remains of a forgotten few, the only legacy left by a handful of pioneer families who were driven from these drought-stricken plains after 1916. Today this little cemetery on the prairie holds a mystery, the identities of those laid to rest, and the number of individuals interred here, having been lost over time.

Continue reading Who are the forgotten dead of Vulcan County?