Category Archives: Sights

Here’s to the Grange

The venerable Grange in 2006. It was a good day.

Last weekend was a bad one for Carmangay.

On Sunday this village of 250 was visited twice by fire, the scourge of many an old tyme prairie burg.

The region’s infamous gales drove a blaze eastward across the tinder dry plains towards the town, prompting an evacuation of the community Sunday afternoon.

The prairie fire burned up miles of the surrounding countryside, with videos of the onrushing inferno going viral, and grabbing headlines nationwide.

However in Carmangay, it is the loss of the venerable Grange Hotel in a conflagration hours earlier that this weekend will surely be remembered for.

Mere days after hosting the annual “world’s shortest St. Patrick’s Day parade”, the Grange, with its iconic creamsicle coloured façade, was razed to the ground during the wee hours of Sunday, taking with it over 110 years of history and hijinks.

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A Row of One – Vulcan, Alberta

Grain elevators—often called prairie icons, vanishing sentinels, or prairie cathedrals on the horizon—once symbolized the rural landscape across the Canadian prairies.

Grain elevators signalled the location of the region’s villages and towns. Particularly prosperous communities had multiple elevators which provided better services and a stable tax base.

The town of Vulcan is located along the Canadian Pacific’s Aldersyde Subdivision, a secondary mainline between Lethbridge and Calgary, that opened for traffic in October 1911. During the construction of the railway, the grain elevators were erected at the various sidings along the line to receive grain from the surrounding district.

Vulcan’s first elevator, built by the Terwilliger Grain Company in 1911-1912, boasted a capacity of 25,000 bushels. It was joined in 1912 by the Alberta Grain Company’s (forerunner to Alberta Pacific Grain) 40,000-bushel elevator, and Taylor Milling’s elevator and warehouse, with a combined capacity of 12,000 bushels.

The makings of “Nine in a Line” at Vulcan. In addition to eight elevators (soon to be nine), adding to the skyline was the CPR’s mechanical coaling plant, erected in 1928 in the far distance. (Glenbow Museum & Archives) – W.J. Oliver

Vulcan was typical of the sidings located every six to ten miles by the railways in the West, the practical distance that grain could be delivered from the farm by horse-drawn means in a day.  The railways provided sites at these points at nominal rental where the line companies could erect their elevators. 

Continue reading A Row of One – Vulcan, Alberta

Motoring on the boulevard of Sunnynook

"Last night I had a most beautiful dream. I was motoring on the boulevard of Sunnynook, which was beautified by a row of trees, while on each side, as far as the eye could seem were field of golden grain which were fast being harvested…Looking further ahead I could see a splendid town, with its business blocks, its public buildings and elevators, which stood ready to welcome the visitor, the toiler, the business man, or any law abiding person who wished to enter. As I drew near the town, I passed one of its magnificent parks, a haven of rest for the weary, standing forth on all its glorious splendor. But, alas, my dream ended upon my coming in contact with a passing vehicle, and the next I knew I was in the Sunnynook Hospital, when I heard the Doctor say: "He will live." Now I am back to reality and my mind often reverts to the works of that good old song, "When Dreams Come True." – Excerpt from "Sunnynook", Hanna Herald, May 29, 1919. (Hat tip to the great David C. Jones, Empire of Dust, p.97) @specialareas @travelspecialareas #mybadlands #forgottenalberta

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This is Homestead Coulee

A legacy of the boom years in Alberta is the network of paved highways running through some of the most sparsely populated areas of the province. One of these roads is Secondary Highway 570, which passes by Homestead Coulee, a locality within Special Area #2. A plaque from Alberta’s 75th celebration provides the following history: “We dedicate this cairn to the pioneers who settled the Homestead Coulee area. In 1912 this piece of land located on the NW 1/4 of S-33 T-26 R-15 W-4, was approved by the Department of Education for the building of a one room school which operated until it closed in 1932, due to lack of pupils. In 1960 a modern school was built to replace the old one. In 1975 a community centre and gymnasium was built. Homestead Coulee school was named after the Homestead Coulee, which runs just east of here into the Red Deer River.” @specialareas @travelspecialareas #mybadlands #forgottenalberta

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