Category Archives: Road trips

Here’s to the Grange

The venerable Grange in 2006. It was a good day.

Last weekend was a bad one for Carmangay.

On Sunday this village of 250 was visited twice by fire, the scourge of many an old tyme prairie burg.

The region’s infamous gales drove a blaze eastward across the tinder dry plains towards the town, prompting an evacuation of the community Sunday afternoon.

The prairie fire burned up miles of the surrounding countryside, with videos of the onrushing inferno going viral, and grabbing headlines nationwide.

However in Carmangay, it is the loss of the venerable Grange Hotel in a conflagration hours earlier that this weekend will surely be remembered for.

Mere days after hosting the annual “world’s shortest St. Patrick’s Day parade”, the Grange, with its iconic creamsicle coloured façade, was razed to the ground during the wee hours of Sunday, taking with it over 110 years of history and hijinks.

Continue reading Here’s to the Grange

Mike Drew, Hemaruka, and A mention in passing

My friend and colleague, Lorena Franchuk, alerted me to the fact that the legendary Calgary Sun photographer and columnist, Mike Drew, was on CBC Radio earlier today.

While I don’t know him personally, Mike was a great inspiration to me in the early days of this project. I was pleased to hear he and I are clearly cut from the same cloth, as he adheres to the same philoshphy on the Rockies as myself: you’ve seen one mountain, you’ve seen them all.

Be sure to listen in here:

https://www.cbc.ca/listen/live-radio/1-1/clip/15832445

The interview was also notable for the surprising amount of time taken discussing the desert outpost of Hemaruka.

Located roughly about half-way between Veteran and Youngstown on SH 884, this almost forgotten prairie burg is notable for its name, which is derived from a rather prolific railroad official named Warren:

Continue reading Mike Drew, Hemaruka, and A mention in passing

Welcoming Jason Sailer to the FAB Team

I’m excited to announce that Jason Sailer has joined the Forgotten Alberta gang as a guest contributor!

Possessing deep roots in the rural south, and much love for Alberta’s heritage, Jason is a great addition to the Forgotten Alberta  (FAB) team .

His love of Alberta history is home grown. Raised on a family farm on the northern slopes of the Cypress Hills, Jason possesses a lifelong appreciation for the history and the struggles of the pioneers, many of who were his own relatives, and their quest to settle on the raw prairie at the turn of the century.

Continue reading Welcoming Jason Sailer to the FAB Team

Forgotten Alberta is coming to Brooks

A quick note for any and all who are interested: I will be speaking about topics related to history in the Brooks area on October 5 at the Brooks Public Library.

I will also be airing my latest project, Above and Beyond, a short documentary about Bassano’s flying doctor, Alexander G. Scott, for all in attendance.

Many thanks to the Alberta Genealogical Society, Brooks and District Branch, for asking me to stop by and to ramble a bit about my old stomping grounds.

The Lund Home

“Here on these prairie plains I stay,
Wanting nevermore to stray,
The winter days will come once more,
And north winds whistle ’round the door.

For always in my heart I sing
The song of a wondrous prairie spring,
And the melody to me so dear,
Is only this – My home is here.”

– An excerpt from “My Home Is Here.” by Lydia Montallan of Carseland.

Originally published in the June 1947 issue of Canadian Cattleman, “My Home Is Here” appears alongside an article about Otelie Lund in “The Piegan Country”, a 1966 history of the Maleb area of S.E. Alberta. Natives of Norway, Ms. Lund (b. 1880) and her husband, Lars, settled in what was known as the Glen Banner district in 1909. The Lunds built a two-storey home in 1917, a local landmark which still stands to this day on a hilltop five miles north of present-day Orion (pictured).

The hardships were many for Ms. Lund. Widowed when she was 70, fifteen years later she was still feeding cattle, chopping wood, hauling coal, and living without electricity. A 1965 article in the Medicine Hat News celebrated her as a “living example of true pioneer spirit and courage”:

“Mrs. Lund, who did not have a family to raise, has not seen a relative since coming to this country in 1909. She had left behind in Norway a large family of sisters and brothers when she came with her new husband on the new venture. Perhaps all her dreams weren’t realized, but building a new life in a new country has brought many satisfactions to Mrs. Lund as she now looks back on it all and treasures each precious memory of old times, old days, old friends.”

Ms. Lund passed away ten years later at the age of 95.