Category Archives: General

Brooks Museum First World War exhibit features #WW1 trench

The Brooks and District Museum have put together an exhibit commemorating the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War. The exhibit provides an overview of the Great War, and chronicles the role of local residents in the global conflict.

Display
A display case is full to the brim with wartime memorabilia including German Pickelhaubes and “potato mashers”; a portrait entitled “March to the Battlefield or Canada’s Men on the Way”; wartime medals loaned by local families; and a portrait of Cpl. William “Bill” Beresford of Millicent, a veteran of wars in South Africa, India and Europe.
Swagger-Stick
A “swagger stick”, standard issue for officers of the Great War. The description reads: “A short stick carried by officers that showed their authority. It helped them keep their hands out of their pockets and could be used for punishment.” It’s rumoured to be similar to the kind used by the Hon. Alison Redford to keep the Premier’s office in line.
Casualty-Clearing-Station
A replica of a battlefront casualty clearing station, featuring Canadian nurses called “bluebirds”, so named for their distinctive blue and white attire.
Trench
As the first tank of the Somme rumbles off into a sodden shell crater, visitors are invited to venture into a replica of a WW1 trench.
Rats
Inside the trench a lonely old soul, crouching low to avoid sniper fire and shrapnel, pines for days of yore out on the homestead at Tide Lake where the meadowlark and the warm prairie breeze, not trench foot and vermin, were his constant companions.

Kinnondale the epicentre of “massive meteor strike”?

Welcome to Kinnondale. (Not actually Kinnondale)
Welcome to Kinnondale. (Not actually Kinnondale)

Kinnondale isn’t the end of the world, but you can see what it might look like from there.

A media release from the University of Alberta has reported the discovery of “an ancient ring-like structure in southern Alberta”.

Situated “near the southern Alberta hamlet of Bow City“, it is speculated the impact site was struck by a meteorite large enough to leave an eight-kilometre-wide crater.

The impact site was discovered by a geologist with the Alberta Geological Survey, Paul Glombick, and studied by a U of A team led by Doug Schmitt, Canada Research Chair in Rock Physics.

According to researchers from the Alberta Geological Survey and University of Alberta, the impact would have produced an explosion strong enough to destroy present-day Calgary:

“An impact of this magnitude would kill everything for quite a distance,” [said Doug Schmitt]. “If it happened today, Calgary (200 km to the northwest) would be completely fried and in Edmonton (500 km northwest), every window would have been blown out. Something of that size, throwing that much debris in the air, potentially would have global consequences; there could have been ramifications for decades.”

Having picked up various tidbits of info on what has been referred to as the “Bow City structure” over the years, I believe the impact site is more accurately situated in the Kinnondale district, located west of the present-day hamlet of Bow City.

In the days to come I am going to do my level best to seek out the epicentre of the Bow City meteor strike, which may or may not be within sight of Kinnondale, Alberta.

Stay tuned…

Related:

The story of Forgotten Alberta

On March 14, I was privileged to join a diverse lineup of presenters at Medicine Hat’s Esplanade Heritage and Cultural Centre for the second Pecha Kucha Night of 2014.

It was an interesting and informative night for all involved, and I’d like to thank Pecha Kucha organizers for inviting me to present.

For those who missed it, or who are looking to kill roughly seven minutes, I’m happy to present the Story of Forgotten Alberta.

Forgotten Alberta is coming to Medicine Hat’s PechaKucha Night (V.2)

I imagine PechaKucha going something like this...
I imagine PechaKucha going something like this…

Clear your calendars Medicine Hat!

On March 14, I will be joining some of the southeast’s most creative and interesting people at the second PechaKucha Night of 2014, taking place at the Esplanade Studio Theatre, start time 8:20 p.m. 

As one of a dozen presenters on the evening (details below), i will be talking about the Forgotten Alberta blog, and why it is poised to change the course of world history, or something like that.

Continue reading Forgotten Alberta is coming to Medicine Hat’s PechaKucha Night (V.2)