#FABTrip15: Esther elevates the discussion

Our last stop on the Alberta leg of the abandoned C.N.R. line running north of Hanna was at Esther, a bona fide ghost town north east of Oyen, and site of the oldest remaining wooden Alberta Wheat Pool elevator . Although the townsite seems to have become an extension of someone’s farm yard, the presence of mailboxes within, and signage commemorating previous occupants of the remaining structures, re-assured us it was okay to have a quick look around.

Our visit and social sharing inspired nostalgia amonsgt many of our followers online, further evidence of the power these fast-disappearing wooden structures have in evoking memories amongst prairie people of the way way were, as well as a longing and reverence for the way things used to be.  

 

Out of gas. Esther #Alberta #Canada #ghosttown #abandoned #truck #mybadlands #FABTrip15 @gregfarries A photo posted by Jonathan Koch (@forgotten_alberta) on

UPDATE: From the comments, Maxine (Pratt) Christensen, added provided the following historical background about Esther:

I grew up a mile south of here, back when the railroad tracks were still there and the elevator was still in operation. My grandfather, Jim Pratt, hauled the first load of grain to that elevator with a team and wagon and I believe that his friend Leonard Westerlund hauled the second. The final load of grain was hauled there by Leonard Westerlund and my grandfather rode along. My father, George Pratt, also worked in the elevator when he was a young man.

A correction to what the sign in front of the garage says. You noted that it says DJ Pratt, and I believe that should be BJ Pratt, as that was my uncle Bruce. Also, the AWJR Pratt is actually AWJ & R Pratt, as those were my grandfather (A.W. James) and my other uncle (Roy).

Sources:

4 thoughts on “#FABTrip15: Esther elevates the discussion”

  1. It was sad to see the elevator in rough shape – I wouldn’t be surprised in 5 years to see it gone the way its progressing.

  2. I grew up a mile south of here, back when the railroad tracks were still there and the elevator was still in operation. My grandfather, Jim Pratt, hauled the first load of grain to that elevator with a team and wagon and I believe that his friend Leonard Westerlund hauled the second. The final load of grain was hauled there by Leonard Westerlund and my grandfather rode along. My father, George Pratt, also worked in the elevator when he was a young man.

    A correction to what the sign in front of the garage says. You noted that it says DJ Pratt, and I believe that should be BJ Pratt, as that was my uncle Bruce. Also, the AWJR Pratt is actually AWJ & R Pratt, as those were my grandfather (A.W. James) and my other uncle (Roy).

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