Tag Archives: War

Forgotten Alberta Revisited: The C.P.R’s Suffield Subdivision

I was honoured this past year to be asked to submit several pieces to the recently-released Lomond and District history book. I have written several articles about this are since starting the Forgotten Alberta project, many of which are based on previous compositions and columns now buried within the deepest, darkest recesses of this blog. One such article was the following history of the Canadian Pacific Railway’s Suffield Subdivision. Originally a two-parter, I have combined both articles into a single essay, which hopefully is an improvement.

I am also grateful to Jason Paul Sailer, Alberta heritage hero, founder of the Ogilvie Wooden Grain Elevator Society, and editor of the Galt Railway Museum blog,  for his assistance editing this article, and for adding the recent history of the both Suffield / Lomond and Kipp /Turin CPR Subdivisions. Read on, and let me know what you think!

Continue reading Forgotten Alberta Revisited: The C.P.R’s Suffield Subdivision

#FABTrip15: Pte. John Harold Fenton of Cavendish, Lest We Forget

 

John Harold Fenton reported for duty on June 10, 1918. A farmer’s son from the windswept plain at Cavendish, Alberta, young Fenton was just 17 when he journeyed west to Calgary to enlist in the Alberta Regiment of the Canadian Expeditionary Force.  Possibly driven by patriotism, a desire for adventure, or the need to escape the dusty desolation of the drybelt, Private Fenton signed up just as the Great War was drawing to a close. While Germany’s forces on the Western Front were nearing defeat by October 1918, another deadly foe was emerging from the east, this time closer to home. Read more at www.forgottenalberta.com #LestWeForget #Alberta #Canada #RemembranceDay #WW1 #abandoned #forgotten #pioneer #cemetery #history #mybadlands #FABTrip15 @gregfarries

A photo posted by Jonathan Koch (@forgotten_alberta) on

John Harold Fenton reported for duty on June 10, 1918. A farmer’s son from the windswept plain at Cavendish, Alberta, young Fenton was just 17 when he journeyed west to Calgary to enlist in the Alberta Regiment of the Canadian Expeditionary Force.  Possibly driven by patriotism, a desire for adventure, or the need to escape the dusty desolation of the drybelt, Private Fenton signed up just as the Great War was drawing to a close. While Germany’s forces on the Western Front were nearing defeat by October 1918, another deadly foe  was emerging from the east, this one closer to home.

Continue reading #FABTrip15: Pte. John Harold Fenton of Cavendish, Lest We Forget

#FABTrip15: We see more of Hanna on Day Two

The Seymour Hotel in Hanna #Alberta #Canada #abandoned #hotel #mybadlands #FABTrip15 @gregfarries

A photo posted by Jonathan Koch (@forgotten_alberta) on

At the start of Day 2, we left behind the unfinished business to snoop around Hanna, before heading north to parts unknown. In our tour we came across a business that was definitely finished, and some contemporary finishes to some classic brick work in the heart of Hanna, which provided fodder for Greg’s scathing social commentary. Continue reading #FABTrip15: We see more of Hanna on Day Two

Brooks Museum First World War exhibit features #WW1 trench

The Brooks and District Museum have put together an exhibit commemorating the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War. The exhibit provides an overview of the Great War, and chronicles the role of local residents in the global conflict.

Display
A display case is full to the brim with wartime memorabilia including German Pickelhaubes and “potato mashers”; a portrait entitled “March to the Battlefield or Canada’s Men on the Way”; wartime medals loaned by local families; and a portrait of Cpl. William “Bill” Beresford of Millicent, a veteran of wars in South Africa, India and Europe.
Swagger-Stick
A “swagger stick”, standard issue for officers of the Great War. The description reads: “A short stick carried by officers that showed their authority. It helped them keep their hands out of their pockets and could be used for punishment.” It’s rumoured to be similar to the kind used by the Hon. Alison Redford to keep the Premier’s office in line.
Casualty-Clearing-Station
A replica of a battlefront casualty clearing station, featuring Canadian nurses called “bluebirds”, so named for their distinctive blue and white attire.
Trench
As the first tank of the Somme rumbles off into a sodden shell crater, visitors are invited to venture into a replica of a WW1 trench.
Rats
Inside the trench a lonely old soul, crouching low to avoid sniper fire and shrapnel, pines for days of yore out on the homestead at Tide Lake where the meadowlark and the warm prairie breeze, not trench foot and vermin, were his constant companions.

WW1: Finding your family members who served in the Great War

The following is a guest post kindly submitted by Rosemary Koch, a.k.a. “Mum”.

Many older readers who had family members who fought in WW1 remember dusty photos on the mantelpiece or the piano of the bright eyed young men smiling proudly in their smart new military uniforms before marching off to war. So many of them, some no more than eighteen went off to fight in the years 1914-18 and never returned

These photos which for decades were a part of the furniture now have new meaning as the centenary of the start of Great War approaches. People are starting to take an interest in their family history and researching those great uncles and grandfathers who fought in that war from which so many never returned or came back wounded in body and spirit.

Continue reading WW1: Finding your family members who served in the Great War