Tag Archives: Brooks

Historic images of western Canadian towns can be found at Prairie-towns.com


(Hover over image to activate slideshow options – Slides courtesy of Glen Lundeen / prairie-towns.com)

The launch of Prairie-towns.com signals yet another online endeavour to preserve the history and heritage of Western Canadian communities.

Contained within the collection are over 2700 photos, many postcard images, from 400+ communities throughout Alberta and Saskatchewan. Amongst the total is are several pioneer-era postcards from southeast Alberta communities such as Alderson, Chinook, Orion and Suffield (see above) that have withered considerably, or disappeared altogether since the images were captured.

Continue reading Historic images of western Canadian towns can be found at Prairie-towns.com

Prairie Post: Former Bow City site to get a heritage marker

PrairiePostLogo

A great article below from the August 1, 2014 edition of the Prairie Post by Rose Sanchez detailing the contributions of many towards a successful heritage marker application for the village of Bow City.

Former Bow City site to get a heritage marker

The former site of what was meant to be a metropolis — Bow City — will be remembered for years to come with an Alberta heritage marker.

Vulcan County officials were successful in seeing their application approved. It was submitted to the Heritage Markers Program at the end of January.

The program is meant to support the installation of markers that “promote greater awareness of the historic people, places, events and themes that have defined the character of the province.”

Jonathan Koch, who operates the Forgotten Alberta website which showcases history of the southeast corner of the province, was instrumental in helping pull the application together, along with Liza Dawber, grants and program co-ordinator for Vulcan County.

Vulcan County officials have become more aware of the history in their area since starting the municipal heritage partnership project in 2011.

“This is a very cool, interesting story,” says Dawber, about Bow City. “We’ve become much more aware of some of the very interesting stories that happened throughout time in Vulcan County.”

Click here to read the rest of the article

Related: Bow City – the village born unlucky.

Brooks Museum First World War exhibit features #WW1 trench

The Brooks and District Museum have put together an exhibit commemorating the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War. The exhibit provides an overview of the Great War, and chronicles the role of local residents in the global conflict.

Display
A display case is full to the brim with wartime memorabilia including German Pickelhaubes and “potato mashers”; a portrait entitled “March to the Battlefield or Canada’s Men on the Way”; wartime medals loaned by local families; and a portrait of Cpl. William “Bill” Beresford of Millicent, a veteran of wars in South Africa, India and Europe.
Swagger-Stick
A “swagger stick”, standard issue for officers of the Great War. The description reads: “A short stick carried by officers that showed their authority. It helped them keep their hands out of their pockets and could be used for punishment.” It’s rumoured to be similar to the kind used by the Hon. Alison Redford to keep the Premier’s office in line.
Casualty-Clearing-Station
A replica of a battlefront casualty clearing station, featuring Canadian nurses called “bluebirds”, so named for their distinctive blue and white attire.
Trench
As the first tank of the Somme rumbles off into a sodden shell crater, visitors are invited to venture into a replica of a WW1 trench.
Rats
Inside the trench a lonely old soul, crouching low to avoid sniper fire and shrapnel, pines for days of yore out on the homestead at Tide Lake where the meadowlark and the warm prairie breeze, not trench foot and vermin, were his constant companions.

Bow City getting village status historical marker

Good news everyone! From the Brooks Bulletin, intrepid scribe Rob Brown informs the masses that the Province of Alberta has approved Vulcan County’s application for a historical marker at the site of the former Village of Bow City (reproduced below).

A big thank you is owed to Liza Dawber and Vulcan County for their work approving and submitting the Heritage Marker application, and the community partners who supported the application.

Bow City getting village status historical marker

Just in time for next week’s 100th anniversary of becoming a village, Bow City has been awarded a historical marker noting the fact.
On July 13, 1914 Bow City was incorporated as a village.

Last week, Jonathan Koch, an avid historian working on the recognition project, said the province notified him a marker is forthcoming.

He says it is important to recognize the past.

“We certainly do run the risk of losing our history if these aren’t marked and people aren’t doing the work,” he says.

Continue reading Bow City getting village status historical marker

Our journey to the beautiful, boring, bowl-shaped structure of Bow City (Kinnondale)

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“It’s probably one of the most boring places. It’s beautiful, but it’s flatline and in that sense it’s quite boring.”

As you may have read on this very blog, the University of Alberta announced on May 7 that a team led by Dr. Doug Schmitt had discovered the “roots” of a crater—a “bowl-shaped structure”—theorized to have been left by a massive meteorite strike just west of Bow City, Alberta.


View Bow City Crater in a larger map – Source: University of Alberta

According to Dr. Schmitt, all that remains of the “Bow City Crater” today is “a semicircular depression eight kilometres across with a central peak”. However, evidence suggests that a meteor strike within the last 70 million years left a crater that was initally eight-kilometres wide, 1.6 to 2.4 km deep, and produced an explosion “strong enough to destroy present-day Calgary”.

“An impact of this magnitude would kill everything for quite a distance,” stated the professor in a UofA media release. “If it happened today, Calgary (200 km to the northwest) would be completely fried and in Edmonton (500 km northwest), every window would have been blown out. Something of that size, throwing that much debris in the air, potentially would have global consequences; there could have been ramifications for decades.”

In an interview with Calgary Herald’s Colette Derworiz, Dr. Schmitt described the site of the discovery, a vast expanse of grazing lease and farm land about 30 miles southwest of Brooks as: “…probably one of the most boring places. It’s beautiful, but it’s flatline and in that sense it’s quite boring.”

As it turns out, I happened to spend a considerable chunk of my youth living a few miles west of this beautiful, boring and flatline place; on a farm situated in an area formerly known as Kinnondale. 

Area pioneers and their descendents have long been aware of the existence of “an ancient ring-like structure” north of Kinnondale. Referred to by the locals as “the sundial”, and others as “Canada’s Stonehenge”, the Majorville Medicine Wheel has been studied extensively by academics and mystics alike. 

Prime grazing lease - Looking southeast from the Majorville Medicine Wheel towards Bow City. During the early part of the 20th Century, this mixed-grass prairie supported some of the biggest cattle and horse herds in the country.
Prime grazing lease – Looking southeast from the Majorville Medicine Wheel towards Bow City, c. 2010. During the early part of the 20th Century, this mixed-grass prairie supported some of the biggest cattle and horse herds in the country.

However, the revelation there was yet another “ancient ring-like structure” at Bow City (Kinnondale), hidden in plain sight for longer than anyone could remember, caught the community by surprise. 

As a fan and chronicler of boring places across the southeast, especially ones close to my childhood home, I felt the need to investigate.

Continue reading Our journey to the beautiful, boring, bowl-shaped structure of Bow City (Kinnondale)